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EFFECT OF JOB-HOPPING ON EARLY CAREER

What is job-hopping and
How it can affect career success

Job-hopping is simply the practice of moving from job to job or in my words jumping around from one offer to another

It might look reasonable with a surface look but can you imagine going to different universities before graduating a course or better still having changing course of study every session.

You know it wouldn't be nice on the success, such also for early career man and women.
5f0df4b747284

CAREER EFFECT OF JOB-HOPPING

What is the effect of one on the other? How long is too long for staying in a company?
I must admit, the resumes that pass by my desk makes me conclude that job-hopping is far too common in many early career.

Job hoppers do it for various reasons. Not just better offer, sometime in rift and many other reasons. More often than not they may not know what they are getting into.
Often times it is because they do not know what they want and hence are not ready for the challenges that lay ahead of them. Job-hopping can have great effect on career success especially for in an early career stage, with not much previous track record and achievements.

Consider this, what signals are you sending to your potential employer if you job-hop TOO OFTEN?

THE TWO-YEAR RULE
I have a two-year rule that I tell my staff and potential employees. The two-year rule is this – you must be willing to commit mentally to spend at least two years in the company before you quit. The reason is this; you need to deal with the learning curve. If you job-hop too often, you learn nothing substantial.

For me, it takes you at least a year to know the ins and outs of the company. Then another year before you can eventually be truly productive in adding value to the company. To see the true results of your contribution to the company, for me it takes at least two years. So, if you are prone to job-hopping and career success is on your mind, then it is time to rethink.

TRAINING YOU
Many well-established companies have training programs. They are willing to invest in fresh graduates and newbies. However, in order for them to make that decision they need to look at past track records.
Ask yourself, if you are a manager – who are you more likely to invest training time and money on?
Someone who is job-hopper and shows tendency to job-hop or
someone who is stable?

Companies are more likely to invest in people who are stable. The reason is simple. They are able to contribute back into the company. Everybody wins. If you are constantly job-hopping, you send a signal that you are not ready to commit.

Companies like to invest in people who see their career goals align with their corporate goals. Job-hoppers usually cannot see their career path beyond the next year or better offer.

HOW TO REDUCE JOB-HOPPING
One of the best ways to quit job-hopping is to truly know what you want. Once you know that, you will have singular focus in the pursuit of your career goals. Of course, it is understandable that as a fresh graduate or newbie at work it is tough to know that. You may be interested in some other industries.

If there are other fields that you are interested in then make a plan to find out about them. Start with the Internet, and then ask friends who may know people in those fields. Speak to them; ask them about the expectations of the company and the role of the position you are interested in.

You may not have all the answers but at least you get some idea. That would decrease the chances of you job-hopping. That is how you can right position yourself not to come to a point of doing what you don't love.
5f0df4f9c976c

MAKE LEARNING A KEY OBJECTIVE NOT MONEY
If you are new in the work force and have been job-hopping quite a bit, my advice to you is this - truly find out what you want. Once you know that, find a company that is willing to train or how they are willing to commit to their employees’ career in the long term. If they have structured training programs, join them.

Make learning the relevant skills and knowledge in that industry your key objective. The skills and knowledge that you learn will contribute to your career success in the long term. It is something that you can bring with you the rest of your life. Once you see the benefits of committing to a company who is willing to train you for more than two years, hopefully you won’t be job-hopping often anymore.

As We Conclude Always Leave Your Employer On Good Terms and Save Yourself Headaches Despite The Stage of The Company A Startup or Large Organisation

In Summary:
Use an exit interview as a tool instead of a personal gripe session.

The exit interview is not a time to burn bridges with your old company. It has become a very common ritual and the idea behind it is to find out from departing staff members, when they no longer have to worry about protecting jobs, exactly what things the company can improve upon.

The interview is designed to be a tool for making a company more efficient and a better place to work. However, many employees who are leaving an organization use this as a time to vent frustrations they may have felt. They see it as a personal gripe session, and loose inhibitions, sometimes venting personal ad homonym attacks against co-workers, and especially against former supervisors and bosses. This is never a wise idea.

Dale Carnegie and other personal growth gurus have told business people for many years that it is never good to burn bridges and offend someone when you could just as easily avoid it. It comes down to the old saying, “you can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.” Keep that saying in mind before the exit interview.

Remember that if you make personal attacks they will be seen as such by the people who read the interview report. If you have genuine suggestions for improvement, your case could be weakened by making personal attacks. You don’t really gain anything from attacking or bad mouthing the people you used to work with or work for anyway, and you may regret saying something in anger later on when you are thinking more clearly.

Use the interview as a constructive tool, with good intentions. The company you used to work for did, after all, provide you with a way of making a living for the time you spent with them. Granted, you provided services to them that they needed. And, they paid you a salary or wages. Hopefully it was a fair exchange. If you have honest concerns, then the interview can be constructive.

For example, one reporter for a local weekly newspaper stressed that the computers being used were old and out of date, and that the firewall software used was ineffective. The system had suffered attacks of computer viruses in the past, and it was obvious to the reporter that the managing editor was not computer literate enough to understand how to fix the problem. The reporter knew that the publisher and the business manager would both read the exit interview report, so she carefully and diplomatically worded her comments, showing that buying new computers and new software would save the newspaper money in the long run.

By wording it carefully during her exit interview she got her ideas across to the appropriate people, and they took her comments seriously because she had nothing to gain and nothing to lose, and seemed to be reporting this situation for the good of the newspaper and staff. In this manner the exit interview benefited everyone involved.

Be careful about kicking the door, it might come back to hurt you.

I have seen employees leave their employers and got re-hired again after a while, so close the door well so that you might enter through it again if need be

Cc E Thanks.

If you are yet to join our community of people living life after NYSC Click Here To Do That

What is job-hopping and How it can affect career success Job-hopping is simply the practice of moving from job to job or in my words jumping around from one offer to another It might look reasonable with a surface look but can you imagine going to different universities before graduating a course or better still having changing course of study every session. You know it wouldn't be nice on the success, such also for early career man and women. ![5f0df4b747284](serve/attachment&path=5f0df4b747284) **CAREER EFFECT OF JOB-HOPPING** What is the effect of one on the other? How long is too long for staying in a company? I must admit, the resumes that pass by my desk makes me conclude that job-hopping is far too common in many early career. Job hoppers do it for various reasons. Not just better offer, sometime in rift and many other reasons. More often than not they may not know what they are getting into. Often times it is because they do not know what they want and hence are not ready for the challenges that lay ahead of them. Job-hopping can have great effect on career success especially for in an early career stage, with not much previous track record and achievements. Consider this, what signals are you sending to your potential employer if you job-hop TOO OFTEN? **THE TWO-YEAR RULE** I have a two-year rule that I tell my staff and potential employees. The two-year rule is this – you must be willing to commit mentally to spend at least two years in the company before you quit. The reason is this; you need to deal with the learning curve. If you job-hop too often, you learn nothing substantial. For me, it takes you at least a year to know the ins and outs of the company. Then another year before you can eventually be truly productive in adding value to the company. To see the true results of your contribution to the company, for me it takes at least two years. So, if you are prone to job-hopping and career success is on your mind, then it is time to rethink. **TRAINING YOU** Many well-established companies have training programs. They are willing to invest in fresh graduates and newbies. However, in order for them to make that decision they need to look at past track records. Ask yourself, if you are a manager – who are you more likely to invest training time and money on? Someone who is job-hopper and shows tendency to job-hop or someone who is stable? Companies are more likely to invest in people who are stable. The reason is simple. They are able to contribute back into the company. Everybody wins. If you are constantly job-hopping, you send a signal that you are not ready to commit. Companies like to invest in people who see their career goals align with their corporate goals. Job-hoppers usually cannot see their career path beyond the next year or better offer. **HOW TO REDUCE JOB-HOPPING** One of the best ways to quit job-hopping is to truly know what you want. Once you know that, you will have singular focus in the pursuit of your career goals. Of course, it is understandable that as a fresh graduate or newbie at work it is tough to know that. You may be interested in some other industries. If there are other fields that you are interested in then make a plan to find out about them. Start with the Internet, and then ask friends who may know people in those fields. Speak to them; ask them about the expectations of the company and the role of the position you are interested in. You may not have all the answers but at least you get some idea. That would decrease the chances of you job-hopping. That is how you can right position yourself not to come to a point of doing what you don't love. ![5f0df4f9c976c](serve/attachment&path=5f0df4f9c976c) **MAKE LEARNING A KEY OBJECTIVE NOT MONEY** If you are new in the work force and have been job-hopping quite a bit, my advice to you is this - truly find out what you want. Once you know that, find a company that is willing to train or how they are willing to commit to their employees’ career in the long term. If they have structured training programs, join them. Make learning the relevant skills and knowledge in that industry your key objective. The skills and knowledge that you learn will contribute to your career success in the long term. It is something that you can bring with you the rest of your life. Once you see the benefits of committing to a company who is willing to train you for more than two years, hopefully you won’t be job-hopping often anymore. **As We Conclude Always Leave Your Employer On Good Terms and Save Yourself Headaches Despite The Stage of The Company A Startup or Large Organisation** In Summary: Use an exit interview as a tool instead of a personal gripe session. The exit interview is not a time to burn bridges with your old company. It has become a very common ritual and the idea behind it is to find out from departing staff members, when they no longer have to worry about protecting jobs, exactly what things the company can improve upon. The interview is designed to be a tool for making a company more efficient and a better place to work. However, many employees who are leaving an organization use this as a time to vent frustrations they may have felt. They see it as a personal gripe session, and loose inhibitions, sometimes venting personal ad homonym attacks against co-workers, and especially against former supervisors and bosses. This is never a wise idea. Dale Carnegie and other personal growth gurus have told business people for many years that it is never good to burn bridges and offend someone when you could just as easily avoid it. It comes down to the old saying, “you can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.” Keep that saying in mind before the exit interview. Remember that if you make personal attacks they will be seen as such by the people who read the interview report. If you have genuine suggestions for improvement, your case could be weakened by making personal attacks. You don’t really gain anything from attacking or bad mouthing the people you used to work with or work for anyway, and you may regret saying something in anger later on when you are thinking more clearly. Use the interview as a constructive tool, with good intentions. The company you used to work for did, after all, provide you with a way of making a living for the time you spent with them. Granted, you provided services to them that they needed. And, they paid you a salary or wages. Hopefully it was a fair exchange. If you have honest concerns, then the interview can be constructive. For example, one reporter for a local weekly newspaper stressed that the computers being used were old and out of date, and that the firewall software used was ineffective. The system had suffered attacks of computer viruses in the past, and it was obvious to the reporter that the managing editor was not computer literate enough to understand how to fix the problem. The reporter knew that the publisher and the business manager would both read the exit interview report, so she carefully and diplomatically worded her comments, showing that buying new computers and new software would save the newspaper money in the long run. By wording it carefully during her exit interview she got her ideas across to the appropriate people, and they took her comments seriously because she had nothing to gain and nothing to lose, and seemed to be reporting this situation for the good of the newspaper and staff. In this manner the exit interview benefited everyone involved. Be careful about kicking the door, it might come back to hurt you. I have seen employees leave their employers and got re-hired again after a while, so close the door well so that you might enter through it again if need be Cc E Thanks. If you are yet to join our community of people living life after NYSC [Click Here To Do That](https://t.me/afternysc)

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edited Jul 15 at 11:52 am
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