Ex Corp Members
THE DO'S AND DON'TS FOR ENTRY LEVEL JOB SEEKERS

Good morning to everyone today we give you the tips to stay ahead of the game, in landing your dream job

1) Don't wait for a job offer to jump-start your career
When jobs seem to be few and far between, it's easy to get discouraged and feel as though you have no control. A good piece of advice is that you don't have to have a job offer to get your career started. "Say you're a newly minted journalism grad (for example) — you've got to get out there and start building your journalism résumé now, even if you haven't been offered a job. Start a blog, get involved in industry organizations, volunteer your writing services — create your own opportunities. And this advice applies across industries," says Charles Purdy. Get motivated by researching the backgrounds of people you admire in your field. They had to start somewhere, too.

2) Don't make your cover letter and résumé all about you
While the main purpose of your résumé is to highlight your personal experience, when employers view it, they're really thinking about themselves and the company. "It's important to remember the cover letter and résumé are about what you can do for the employer, not the other way around," says Josh Tolan. "Showcase the skills you have that are most relevant to your prospective employer, and keep the focus on the company's mission and goals. In your cover letter, mention something you admire about the company and how a specific skill you have could benefit that aspect.

3) Do develop networking skills
In other words, talk to as many people in your field as possible, keep your professional online profiles up-to-date, and keep in contact with any former colleague or manager who could later serve as a reference. As Charles Purdy notes, you should "be smart about networking and your online profile — looking for a job isn't just about searching online and pressing that 'apply' button. After that, you've got to do some research and work your network to find an 'in' at the company." Whatever you do, don't burn bridges with any personal or professional contacts — you'll be exposed to more opportunities and potential success.

4) Do treat your job search as a full-time job itself
Candace Williams puts it simply: "Hustle. Finding a job is a full-time job. If someone were to ask you, 'What did you do to find a job this week?' you should have a long answer that includes time sending résumés/cover letters, networking events, cold calls, informational interviews, research, and time crafting your portfolio/interview materials." It's not always easy, but your hard work will eventually pay off, and you'll definitely thank yourself later for putting in all those hours that led to your success.

5) Do your research
Landing an interview during your grueling job search is an amazing feeling — but the work doesn't stop there. Well before your interview, you should start preparing as many notes as possible about the company and the interviewer you'll be meeting. "In order to be well prepared for an interview, make sure you know the ins and outs of your company first. Look at the company website, research their clients, and check out their social media presence — anything to ensure you're fully versed on the position and the company. That way, you can answer each question thoroughly, and more importantly, tie your answers into the goals of the company," says Josh Tolan.

Good morning to everyone today we give you the tips to stay ahead of the game, in landing your dream job **1) Don't wait for a job offer to jump-start your career** When jobs seem to be few and far between, it's easy to get discouraged and feel as though you have no control. A good piece of advice is that you don't have to have a job offer to get your career started. "Say you're a newly minted journalism grad (for example) — you've got to get out there and start building your journalism résumé now, even if you haven't been offered a job. Start a blog, get involved in industry organizations, volunteer your writing services — create your own opportunities. And this advice applies across industries," says Charles Purdy. Get motivated by researching the backgrounds of people you admire in your field. They had to start somewhere, too. **2) Don't make your cover letter and résumé all about you** While the main purpose of your résumé is to highlight your personal experience, when employers view it, they're really thinking about themselves and the company. "It's important to remember the cover letter and résumé are about what you can do for the employer, not the other way around," says Josh Tolan. "Showcase the skills you have that are most relevant to your prospective employer, and keep the focus on the company's mission and goals. In your cover letter, mention something you admire about the company and how a specific skill you have could benefit that aspect. **3) Do develop networking skills** In other words, talk to as many people in your field as possible, keep your professional online profiles up-to-date, and keep in contact with any former colleague or manager who could later serve as a reference. As Charles Purdy notes, you should "be smart about networking and your online profile — looking for a job isn't just about searching online and pressing that 'apply' button. After that, you've got to do some research and work your network to find an 'in' at the company." Whatever you do, don't burn bridges with any personal or professional contacts — you'll be exposed to more opportunities and potential success. **4) Do treat your job search as a full-time job itself** Candace Williams puts it simply: "Hustle. Finding a job is a full-time job. If someone were to ask you, 'What did you do to find a job this week?' you should have a long answer that includes time sending résumés/cover letters, networking events, cold calls, informational interviews, research, and time crafting your portfolio/interview materials." It's not always easy, but your hard work will eventually pay off, and you'll definitely thank yourself later for putting in all those hours that led to your success. **5) Do your research** Landing an interview during your grueling job search is an amazing feeling — but the work doesn't stop there. Well before your interview, you should start preparing as many notes as possible about the company and the interviewer you'll be meeting. "In order to be well prepared for an interview, make sure you know the ins and outs of your company first. Look at the company website, research their clients, and check out their social media presence — anything to ensure you're fully versed on the position and the company. That way, you can answer each question thoroughly, and more importantly, tie your answers into the goals of the company," says Josh Tolan.

Done: together we are better informed

edited Sep 12 at 8:38 am
10
0
1
live preview
enter atleast 10 characters
WARNING: You mentioned %MENTIONS%, but they cannot see this message and will not be notified
Saving...
Saved
With selected deselect posts show selected posts
All posts under this topic will be deleted ?
Pending draft ... Click to resume editing
Discard draft